Santa Isabel

Santaisabelbag.jpg
Santaisabelbag.jpg

Santa Isabel

from 17.00

WE TASTE: 

Honey, Vanilla, Mango, Peach

ORIGIN: 

Guatemala

 VARIETAL: 

Caturra, Catuai

 ALTITUDE: 

1500 Meters

 PROCESSING: 

Washed and sun dried

size:
Quantity:
Add To Cart

Many of you will remember the Finca Santa Isabel from last year. It's a wonderful farm located in the department of  Santa Rosa , 64 kilometers southeast of Guatemala City. The region's volcanic soil and microclimate are ideal for cultivating the finest quality coffee.  

Santa Isabel Farm has been family owned and operated by four generations of the Keller family since 1899, with the commitment of achieving excellent coffee guided by two solid principles: the search of quality — in organic products and services — and dedication to environmental conservation.

Santa Isabel Farm gives special attention to the welfare of its workers, mainly regarding food, the health program, and living quarters. The Keller family provides for the maintenance of a school, protects plants and animals in a private natural reserve, and supports the population – both in and outside the farm -  with infrastructure.  

Social and environmental innovations are part of every working day at this farm.  The women who come during the harvest season get together to wash their clothes at a circular laundry pool which was built with a setting similar to the river washing pools, therefore facilitating social bonding.  The design for the laundry pool, the houses, and the latrine system, were all based on the traditional customs of the different ethnic groups, demonstrating the social sensitivity of Santa Isabel towards its multicultural labor force. 

In the picture below you will see Alejandro Keller, the manager of Finca Santa Isabel. He has been using organic farming methods since 2005 and tested the effect of different methods on rust-susceptible varietals. They saw that the conventional methods did not protect susceptible varieties from contracting rust, and have focused their efforts on identifying plants which not only are resistant to rust, but also can cope with their “high and dry” terroir.